- Barley GOST 28682-90 Requirements for state purchases and deliveries;
- Barley for brewing GOST 5060-86;
- U.S. STANDARDS FOR BARLEY

- BARLEY DSTU 3769
1-st class - barley for groats, 2-nd class - barley for malting in alcohol manufacture and feed barley, 3-rd class - feed barley.

1 Grain impurities:

1.1 Flattened grains
1.2 Shrunken grains
1.3 Unripe grains
1.4 Sprouted grains

1.5 Damaged grains (with changed seed coat color and endosperm fm creamy to light brown in color)
1.6 Broken grains (for 2-nd and 3-rd classes - 50%)
1.7 Grains damaged by pests (for 2-nd and 3-rd classes -50%)
1.8 Grains and seeds of other cultivated plants (1-st class – not belonging by the nature of their damage to waste impurities; 2-nd and 3-rd classes – belonging by the nature of their damage to grain impurities)
2 Waste impurities
2.1 All that passes through a 1.5 mm sieve
2.2 Mineral impurities
2.3 Organic impurities
2.4 Harmful impurities  - Ergot and smut; - eelworm, Darnel rye-grass, rose stagger, sophora stagger, thermopsis, coronilla, fluffy fruited heliotrope, trichodesma (Trichodesma incanum)
2.5 Seeds of wild growing plants
2.6 Spoiled grains of barley, wheat, spelt, rye and oats
2.7 Grains of barley, wheat, spelt, rye and oats with completely eaten endosperm
2.8 Fusarium affected grains
2.9 Grains and seeds of other cultivated plants, belonging by the nature of their damage to waste impurities
Malting barley
1.    Natural weight
2.    Moisture
3.    Grain impurities
4.    Waste impurities
5.    Finer Grains ( sieve 2.2 x 20 mm)
6.    Coarseness (residue, sieve 2.5 x 20 mm)
7.    Absolute Weight (of 1000 grains)
8.    Protein Content (on dry matter)
6.    Germinating Capacity
7.    Vitality
9.    Extract content
10.    Live pests
11.    Foreign odors
12.     Color
1    Grain impurities:
1.1    Flattened grains
1.2    Shrunken grains
1.3    Unripe grains
1.4    Sprouted grains
1.5    Damaged grains (with changed seed coat color and endosperm fm creamy to light brown in color)
1.6    Broken grains
1.7    Grains damaged by pests
1.8    Grains and seeds of other cultivated plants (not belonging by the nature of their damage to waste impurities)
1.9    Naked grains (completely or partly lost their coats)
2    Waste impurities
2.1    All that passes through a 1.5 mm sieve
2.2    Mineral impurities
2.3    Organic impurities
2.4    Harmful impurities  - Ergot and smut; - eelworm, Darnel rye-grass, rose stagger, sophora stagger, thermopsis, coronilla, fluffy fruited heliotrope, trichodesma (Trichodesma incanum)
2.5    Seeds of wild growing plants
2.6    Spoiled grains of barley, wheat, spelt, rye and oats
2.7    Grains of barley, wheat, spelt, rye and oats with completely eaten endosperm
2.8    Fusarium affected grains
2.9    Grains and seeds of other cultivated plants, belonging by the nature of their damage to waste impurities
Barley GOST 28682-90 Requirements for state purchases and deliveries in russian.
U.S. STANDARDS FOR BARLEY
TERMS DEFINED
810.201 Definition of barley
Grain that, before the removal of dockage, consists of 50 % or more of whole kernels of cultivated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and not more than 25% of other grains for which standards have been established under the United States Grain Standards Act. The term barley as used in these standards does not include hull-less barley or black barley.
810.202 Definition of other terms
(a) Black barley. Barley with black hulls.
(b) Broken kernels. Barley with more than one-fourth of the kernel remored.
(c) Classes. There are three classes for barley: six-rowed barley, two-rowed barley, and barley.
Six-rowed barley
Barley of the six-rowed type with white hulls that contains not more than 10% of two-rowed barley. This class is divided into the following three subclasses:
1). Six-rowed malting barley.
Six-rowed barley of a suitable malting type that has 90% or more of kernels with white aleurone layers; that contains not more than 1.9% of injured-by-frost kernels that may include not more than 0.4% of frost-damaged kernels; not more than 0.2% of injured-by-heat kernels that may include not more than 0.1% of heat-damaged kernels; that is not blighted, ergoty, garlicky, infested, or smutty; and that otherwise meets the grade requirements of the subclass Six-rowed malting barley; and may contain unlimited amounts of injured-by-mold kernels; however, mold-damaged kernels are scored as damaged kernels and against sound barley limits.
2). Six-rowed blue malting barley.
Six-rowed barley of a suitable malting type that has 90% or more of kernels with blue aleurone layers; that contains not more than 1.9% of injured-by-frost kernels that may include not more than 0.4% of frost-damaged kernels; not more than 0.2% of injured-by-heat kernels that may include not more than 0.1% of heat-damaged kernels; that is not blighted, ergoty, garlicky, infested, or smutty; and that otherwise meets the grade requirements of the subclass Six-rowed blue malting barley; and may contain unlimited amounts of injured-by-mold kernels; however, mold-damaged kernels are scored as damaged kernels and against sound barley limits.
3). Six-rowed barley.
Any barley of the class Six-rowed barley that does not meet the requirements of the subclass Six-rowed malting barley or Six-rowed blue malting barley.
Two-rowed barley
Barley of the two-rowed type with white hulls that contains not more than 10% of Six-rowed barley. This class is divides into the following two subclasses:
1). Two-rowed malting barley.
Two-rowed barley of a suitable malting type that contains not more than 1.9% of injured-by-frost kernels that may include not more than 0.4% frost-damaged kernels; not more than 1.9% of injured-by-mold kernels that may include not more than 0.4% of mold-damaged kernels; and not more than 0.2% of injured-by-heat kernels that may include not more than 0.1%of heat-damaged kernels; that is not blighted, ergoty, garlicky, infested, or smutty; and that otherwise meets the grade requirements of the subclass Two-rowed malting barley. Injured-by-frost kernels and injured-by-mold kernels are not scored against sound barley.
2). Two-rowed barley.
Two-rowed barley that does not meet the requirements of the subclass Two-rowed malting barley.
3). Barley.
Barley that does not meet the requirements for the classes Six-rowed barley or Two-rowed barley.
(d) Damaged kernels. Kernels, pieces of barley kernels, other grains, and wild oats that are badly ground-damaged, badly weather-damaged, diseased, frost-damaged, germ-damaged, heat-damaged, injured by-heat, insect-bored, mold-damaged, sprout-damaged, or otherwise materially damaged.
(e) Dockage. All matter other than barley that can be removed from the original sample by use of an approved device according to procedures prescribed in FGIS instructions. Also, undeveloped, shriveled, and small pieces of barley kernels removed in properly separating the material other than barley and that cannot be recovered by properly rescreening or recleaning.
(f) Foreign material. All mater other that barley, other grains, and wild oats that remains in the sample after removal of dockage.
(g) Frost-damaged kernels. Kernels, pieces of barley, other grains, and wild oats that are badly shrunken and distinctly discoloured black or brown by frost.
(h) Germ-damaged kernels. Kernels, pieces of barley kernels, other grains, and wild oats that have dead or disciloured germ ends.
(i) Heat-damaged kernels. Kernels, pieces of barley kernels, other grains, and wild oats that are materially discoloured and damaged by heat.
(j) Injured-by-frost kernels. Kernels and pieces of barley kernels that are distincly indented, immature, or shrunken in appearance or that are light green in colour as a result of frost before maturity.
(k) Injured-by-heat kernels. Kernels, pieces of barley kernels, other grains, and wild oats that are slightly discoloured as a result of heat.
(l) Injured-by-mold kernels. Kernels, pieces of barley kernels containing slight evidence of mold.
(m) Mold-damaged kernels. Kernels, pieces of barley kernels, other grains, and wild oats that are weathered and contain considerable evidence of mold.
(n) Other grains. Black barley, corn, cultivated buckwheat, einkorn, emmer, flaxseed, guar, hull-less barley, nongrain sorghum, oats, Polish wheat, popcorn, poulard wheat, rice, rye, safflower, sorghum, soybeans, spelt, sunflower seed, sweet corn, triticale, and wheat.

Remarks:
Emmer (Triticum dicoccum)
A species of wheat having a spike broken up into segments and
grains that do not thresh free of the chaff; one of the tetraploid wheats.
Guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba)
An annual plant of the legume family, native to India and grown in the SW U.S. for forage
Poulard = hen
Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius)
A thistlelike, annual plant of the composite family, with large, orange flower heads and seeds that yield a drying oil used in paints, foods, medicine, etc.;
a dyestuff or drug prepared from its florets (small flowers).
Blight
Any atmospheric or soil condition, parasite, or insect that kills, withers, or checks the growth of plants.
any of several plant diseases, as rust, mildew, or smut;
the condition or result of being blighted.
Aleuron
Finely granulated protein present in seeds generally and forming the outer layer of cereal seeds.
Mature
A full-grown, as plants or animals; ripe, as fruits.
Maturity
The state or quality of being mature; specif., a being full-grown, ripe, or fully developed.
Weathered
Seasoned by the weather; stained, worn, or beaten by th weather.
Spelt (Triticum spella)
A primitive species of wheat with grains that do not  thresh free of the chaff: now seldom cultivated;
local name for emmer.
Triticale
A hybride produced by crossing durum wheat and rye, with a high protein content and high yield; the grain of the plant.{jcomments on}